Washington column for May 10

Happy Mother’s Day to all

Mother’s Day, celebrated this Sunday (May 13), helps us all remember our mothers for all the good they have done for us.

In 2012, let us all make sure that we take time from the hustle and bustle of our lives to thank the women who gave us life. Here is something I would like to share that comes from the lyricist Howard Johnson:

“M” is for the million things she gave me;

“O” means only that she’s growing old;

“T” is for the tears she shed to save me;

“H” is for her heart of purest gold;

“E” is for her eyes, with love-light shining,

“R” means right, and right she’ll always be.

Put them all together, they spell “Mother,” a word that means the world to me.

Remember how wonderful your mom was to you? Wouldn’t this be an excellent time to say, “I love you, Mom,” with a flower and goodies?

And if you’d like to shop local, stop by 211 Quicke Mart on Saturday (May 12) for the benefit fundraiser by Union First Market Bank’s Relay for Life team – they’ll be selling flowers and baked goodies starting 8:30 a.m.

St. Peter’s Catholic Mission, Washington, holds its bake sale to benefit the Rappahannock Food Pantry this Saturday (May 12) from 9 to 2 at the soccer fields near Rappahannock Elementary School. Turn onto Schoolhouse Road from U.S. 211 and look for the blue tent. Get mom some treats for Mother’s Day and help the Food Pantry.

For all mothers: Happy Mother’s Day!

Rappahannock’s Old Guard

The Old Guard, as Company B, 6th Virginia Cavalry, was known, carried their unique company flag in a memorable 1862 charge against Union cavalry that led to the capture of more than 900 northerners. All are invited as a new Civil War Trails marker commemorating the company is  dedicated at the Rappahannock County Visitors Center this Sunday (May 20) at 3 p.m.Courtesy photo
The Old Guard, as Company B, 6th Virginia Cavalry, was known, carried their unique company flag in a memorable 1862 charge against Union cavalry that led to the capture of more than 900 northerners. All are invited as a new Civil War Trails marker commemorating the company is dedicated at the Rappahannock County Visitors Center this Sunday (May 20) at 3 p.m.

This note came in from the Rappahannock Historical Society’s John R. Tole:

A child sits on an old man’s knee in a scene repeated in many old-time county households. “What did you do in the Civil War, great-great-granddaddy?”

“Well, my child, I rode in the horse cavalry from Rappahannock County. We were formed before the war as a militia unit and were called the Old Guard. Our first leader was Capt. John ‘Shack’ Green. We were camped at Centerville when we took the unanimous vote for secession. Capt. Daniel Grimsley, son of the famous Baptist preacher Barnett Grimsley, later replaced Shack. We were a tough bunch and many of the old families are still here in Rappahannock.

“Our great day came on May 23, 1862, at the hamlet of Cedarville north of Front Royal, after General Jackson had captured the town. We chased the Yankee cavalry up the Winchester Pike (now Route 522/340) and caught up to them at the McKay house that still stands beside the road beyond the Dupont plant. I will never forget the scene. They were squeezed between the fencerows on either side of the road when we made our charge. Dallas Brown, the color bearer, was carrying the company banner, made for us by the ladies of Gordonsville. With its dark background, the Yanks mistook it to be a black flag – meaning we would take no prisoners. They poured lead into our ranks and 21 balls struck Dallas, and many others fell. But the Yanks were no match for us. Over 900 were taken prisoner. Gen. Jackson, who witnessed the affair, said he had never seen a grander charge by cavalry.

“There were 38 of us and all told, we lost nine dead and 21 wounded. None of the survivors of Company B ever forgot that proud day in Rappahannock’s history. As for our ‘black’ flag, it was never used again. To avoid any future confusion it was replaced by the small cavalry version of the battle flag.”

At 3 p.m. this Sunday (May 20), the Rappahannock Historical Society will sponsor a dedication ceremony for a new Civil War Trails marker commemorating Company B., 6th Virginia Cavalry, at the Rappahannock Visitors Center on Library Road, Washington. A special invitation goes out to descendants of Company B troopers. For further information, contact the Society at rapphistsoc@comcast.net or 540-675-1163.

Food Pantry discount

During the Rappahannock Food Pantry Day festivities this Saturday (see the story on page 2), R.H. Ballard is trading discounts for pantry donations. Customers who bring in five non-perishable food items will receive 25 percent off their total purchases (for all shop items and selected art and rugs). All food will be donated in turn to the Food Pantry.

Clothing at $5 a bag

It appears that the residents of Rappahannock County took spring cleaning to heart: The Washington Ladies Auxiliary Thrift Shop is bursting at the seams with high-quality spring and summer clothes for men, women and children. To return the favor, the Thrift Shop is having a $5 Bag Sale from May 14-31. And they’ll provide the brown paper bag; you test your packing skills and see how much you can stuff in, for $5. The shop, at 10 Firehouse Lane, is open 10 to 5 Monday and Wednesday and 9 to 3 Saturday (closed on Memorial Day, May 28).

Birthday wishes

Birthday wishes go out to my son, Jonathan Clatterbuck. He will celebrate his special day this Friday (May 11). Happy birthday, son. Also birthday greetings go out to Warren Foster, who will celebrate his day on Friday, May 18.

WVF&R buffet

The Washington Volunteer Fire and Rescue hosts an all-you-can-eat breakfast buffet from 7 to 11 Saturday, May 19 at the fire hall: scrambled eggs, bacon, sausage, ham, sausage gravy, biscuits, hash browns, pancakes and fried apples, prepared and served by your local fire and rescue volunteers. Cost is $8 ($4 for ages 4 to 12, younger kids free). Proceeds support the company’s daily operations. For information, call 540-675-3615.

Thinking of . . .

In our prayers each day, please remember Charlotte Freeman and Elizabeth Switzer; both have been under the weather.