Washington column for Aug. 9

The Inn’s new general manager

Chef/proprietor Patrick O’Connell and the Inn at Little Washington announced this week the arrival of Thomas F. List II as the Inn’s new general manager for hotel and restaurant operations.

List is a third-generation hotelier who began his career working in New York City hotels at the age of 13. After graduating from the University of Denver School of Hotel and Restaurant Management, he went on to management roles with the legendary Plaza Hotel in New York, the Williamsburg Inn in Colonial Williamsburg; the Woodstock Inn & Resort in Vermont, and the Kedron Valley Inn, also in Vermont, where he was partner and general manager.

List has more than 30 years of experience managing hotels and resorts in the upscale, destination market. His management philosophy has always focused on delivering the highest-level guest experience, where attention to detail is the key to creating once-in-a-lifetime memories. He is relocating to Washington with his wife Cindy and their dogs, Stuart and Kuboi.

“All of us here are delighted to welcome Tom and his wife Cindy to the Inn at Little Washington family,” O’Connell said. “Tom’s background is ideally suited to take on the unique challenges of assisting the evolution of this beloved culinary destination. We are excited about what the future will bring. The legend continues onward and upward.”

What began as a small restaurant in a former garage frequented by those “in the know” has, after more than 30 years, won nearly every culinary award and accolade, and attracted a devoted following from around the world, including being the longest-tenured Forbes Five Star Restaurant in the U.S. The Inn at Little Washington’s success owes as much to O’Connell’s culinary wizardry as to the warm, professional yet personal welcome every guest receives, both in the restaurant and in the 18 luxuriously appointed guest rooms and cottages.

The Inn is a member of Relais & Chateaux, an exclusive alliance of 500 of the finest hotels and gourmet restaurants in 60 countries.

Memorial service

From left, John and Doris Fowler, Ann Blankenship, Terri Harrell, Kathy Pruitt, Matt Kirk and Phillip Cunningham remember a loved one at a memorial service at the Washington Masonic Cemetery Aug. 4.Anna Pullen
From left, John and Doris Fowler, Ann Blankenship, Terri Harrell, Kathy Pruitt, Matt Kirk and Phillip Cunningham remember a loved one at a memorial service at the Washington Masonic Cemetery Aug. 4.

To remember him among friends and family, Anna Pullen of Sperryville held a memorial service at the Washington Masonic Cemetery on Saturday (Aug. 4) for her son, Herbert Wayne Jenkins. High temperatures did not stop John and Doris Fowler, Ann Blankenship, Terri Harrell, Kathy Pruitt, Matt Kirk and Phillip Cunningham from celebrating their memories of Wayne. Matt Kirk read a poem, written by Anna Pullen, in memory of Jenkins, who died Aug. 3, 2010.

Wayne

Two years have passed since you went away. We miss you just as much today.

We hear your voice, we see your smile, hoping we’ll wake up and see you there.

We know you’re in a better place, where no one can cause you to fall from grace.

We know we’ll see you again one day when we all get home to Heaven’s gate.

Quail recovery program

It’s clear, whistled bob-white, bob-white is a familiar sound in the farmlands, thickets and open woodlands, but recent studies have shown a drop or complete disappearance of the bobwhite quail population in Virginia.

Next Wednesday (Aug. 15) at 2 p.m., state biologist Debra Wright will speak at the Rappahannock County Garden Club’s monthly meeting. She will discuss the quail recovery program now underway in Virginia, and how landowners can prepare proper habitat to encourage quail to return and nest. If you are a landowner with a half-acre or more, plan to attend and learn about this valuable program. The meeting is free and open to all at the Washington fire hall. For more information, contact Jeanne Jarrett at 540-675-1000.

As a child growing up on the farm, I remember waking up in the morning to the sound of a bobwhite, and it was such a calming sound.

Sky observers

This ducky double spud, unlike its rubber companion, was grown in Anna and Mae Clatterbuck’s garden two weeks ago in Harris Hollow.Jan Clatterbuck | Rappahannock News
This ducky double spud, unlike its rubber companion, was grown in Anna and Mae Clatterbuck’s garden two weeks ago in Harris Hollow.

A reminder for all of you night sky observers. This is the month when we can take a peek into the summer Milky Way and the heart of our galaxy.

The Perseid meteor shower peaks on the night of Aug. 12. After the first quarter moon sets, around 2 a.m., meteors should be more easily visible until dawn. You may see dozens of meteors per hour. Though viewable till the end of August, it is recommended you view the meteor shower in the first 10 days of August, when reflected moonlight will be at a minimum. So grab your telescope and enjoy the beautiful view of the sky at night. I can say that my eyes will be on the sky, so let’s hope for clear skies.

Community potluck

A community potluck and discussion with Mohsin Ahmad is 7 to 9 p.m. at Trinity Episcopal Church parish hall, Washington. Ahmad is a 2006 Rappahannock County High School exchange student and rising Goucher College junior (upon his return from summer study in China and nonprofit service in his home city of Peshawar, Pakistan). Please join Ahmad for a discussion of intercultural, interfaith topics, including Ramadan, now being observed by Muslims worldwide. Please bring a dish to share; beverages provided. To RSVP or for more information, contact Ellen Adams at 540-937-4670 or email adamsell@gmail.com or Rosa Crocker at 540-636-4505 or rosa@monroecrocker.com.

Book Barn sale

The Book Barn is offering some of its special books at a 25-percent discount for the next two Saturdays (Aug. 11 and 18). Among the interesting titles are such obscure classics as Virginia Woolf’s “Freshwater,” Evelyn Waugh’s “The Loved One,” and “The Worst English Poets,” compiled by Christopher Adams. How about “The Connoisseur’s Book of the Cigar” by Z. Davidoff, translated from the French by Lawrence Grow? Or “The Compleat Angler” by Izaak Walton, a Modern Library Edition? Many other interesting volumes are just waiting for you to discover them.

The Book Barn is next to the Rappahannock County Library on U.S. 211, and is open 9 to 3 every Saturday. All books are donated, all proceeds go to the library and all the staff are volunteers.