Washington column for Aug. 30

Masonic Cemetery

The Rappahannock News has had several walk-ins over the past few weeks who wanted to talk about the Washington Masonic Cemetery’s upkeep. I was told that in some areas the grass was much too tall, so I decided to go there and check it out for myself. On my visit, I found it to be in a very unkempt state indeed; as a matter of fact, I found it a disgrace. The grass was so overgrown that I was ashamed that this was my hometown. Some of the plots, of course, were nicely mowed by family members.

At the Washington Masonic Cemetery, some of the plots were not being maintained properly. Cemeteries are a big part of our heritage, and one that does require care. Photo by Jan Clatterbuck.
At the Washington Masonic Cemetery, some of the plots were not being maintained properly. Cemeteries are a big part of our heritage, and one that does require care. Photo by Jan Clatterbuck.

This is a place we have placed the remains of our loved ones to rest in peace and beauty.

I called to inquire about the upkeep, and was told that the matter would be looked into and that hopefully it would get mowed soon. A question: Why can’t the cemetery have someone mow it on a regular basis? Visiting a cemetery is often a kind of bittersweet experience, but should not be so because of the grounds. Though outside the town borders, the cemetery is still associated with the town of Washington, and grounds that are kept neat and trimmed and looking good reflect on the town. Visitors often walk down the Fodderstack Road to the cemetery, and I wonder what their thoughts are when they see the cemetery in its current state.

Ginger Hill new shops

Washington’s biggest antiques store has just gotten bigger! Ginger Hill Antiques welcomes 11 new shops to the expanding The Shops at Ginger Hill – where, along with the new antiques dealers, Brooke Parkhurst of Triple Oak Bakery will open the Acorn Cafe. Acorn Cafe and Ginger Hill are located just behind Mountainside Physical Therapy on U.S. 211 opposite Rock Mills Road (where you can also get a massage or physical therapy treatment, go to a Pilates or exercise session, or take a dance class at Mountainside’s soon-to-be-expanded dance studio).

Berni Olsen and Dan Lewis pose their dog, Scout, outside their Ginger Hill Antiques on U.S. 211, which has expanded with 11 dealers and a cafe coming from Triple Oak Bakery's Brooke Parkhurst. Photo by Jan Clatterbuck.
Berni Olsen and Dan Lewis pose their dog, Scout, outside their Ginger Hill Antiques on U.S. 211, which has expanded with 11 dealers and a cafe coming from Triple Oak Bakery’s Brooke Parkhurst. Photo by Jan Clatterbuck.

Parkhurst’s cafe will be serving sandwiches, salads, snacks and sweets, according to Ginger Hill co-owner Berni Olson, as well as Central Coffee Roaster’s coffee, a variety of teas (black, green and herbal) and Cocoa Bella’s fabulous brewing chocolate! Acorn Cafe will be open 11 to 4 Friday-Monday.

Phase one of The Shops is completed, Olson says, with dealers bringing their best stock of folk art, primitives, architectural ceramic tiles, Celtic masks and art, gently used furniture and more. Phase two will bring another 15 shops and will be ready to go in October. Owners Olson and Dan Lewis make you feel at home while you shop, and they’re planning an opening party for some time in October – so stop by and check them out.

Catstravaganza coming

Join RappCats in celebrating its fifth anniversary at Catstravaganza – 6 to 10 p.m. Friday, Sept. 21 at Little Washington Winery. With music by the jazz trio Sophisticats, heavy hors d’oeuvres and the winery’s special wines (including Pink Cat), this will be an evening to remember – and also one that will help the homeless, abandoned and abused cats of Rappahannock County.

Auction and raffle items include dinner at The Inn at Little Washington, an overnight stay at Middleton Inn and another overnight and champagne brunch at Richmond’s historic Jefferson Hotel.

RappCats’ all-volunteer supporters hope one day Rappahannock will have its own shelter for cats; proceeds, in the meantime, go towards helping RappCats carry on its mission. Tickets are $55 per person ($100 for couples). Mail checks payable to RappCats to PO Box 307, Washington, VA 22747 or purchase online at rappcats.org. For more information, call 540-987-8099 or email rappcats@rappcats.org. If you unable to attend, please consider a donation.

Volunteers needed

The Child Care and Learning Center (12763 Lee Hwy.) has a small vegetable garden and wants to introduce children to the pleasures – and rewards – of playing in the dirt. Volunteers are needed to help kids weed, water, harvest, plant, explore and to take photos. You do not have to be a master gardener; the goal is to have fun with the kids as they learn about gardening.

If you want to be part of this and have an hour any weekday between 10 and 11 or 3:30 and 4:30, email Hal Hunter at hal@rappahannock.com.

CPR and first aid classes

Child Care and Learning Center is also the site of an upcoming American Red Cross CPR and first aid class aimed at members of the general public who wish to have first-aid and resuscitation training and skills. School bus drivers, child-care providers, teachers, parents, babysitters and others will receive a two-year certification. Preregister (required) with Red Cross instructor Lisa Pendleton, LPN and childcare consultant, at 540-987-8637 or tl2kids@gmail.com. The cost is $60.

From 8 to 4 on Saturday, Oct. 6, CCLC is also the site of a medication administration training course, a three-year certification required in Virginia for providers or staff members from licensed child or adult day care centers and schools who administer prescription drugs. Registrants must have current CPR and first-aid certification. Preregistration (required) for the $100 training course is with MAT instructor Lisa Pendleton (contact information above).

Welcome

Welcome to another new resident, Glynda Bennett, who lives in Harris Hollow!