Lykes Fund gives $48K to local groups

In the first of what it promises will be an annual occurence, the Northern Piedmont Community Foundation (NPCF) awarded substantial grants from the Richard Lykes Rappahannock Community Fund to organizations which, as the fund’s namesake intended, work “for the benefit of Rappahannock County citizens.”

This year the grants totaled $48,406.

Representatives of most of the organizations who received Richard Lykes Community Fund grants pose with Northern Piedmont Community Foundation executive director Cole Johnson (center, holding the oversized check) at a reception at Blue Rock Inn Thursday evening. Photo by Melissa Dargis.
Representatives of most of the organizations who received Richard Lykes Community Fund grants pose with Northern Piedmont Community Foundation executive director Cole Johnson (center, holding the oversized check) at a reception at Blue Rock Inn Thursday evening. Photo by Melissa Dargis.

Those include the Child Care and Learning Center, this year’s single largest grant recipient, which was awarded $10,000 to help fund daycare fees for low-income families, purchase fresh and healthy food and pay for sewer hook-up fees and HVAC repairs; CCLC had requested $29,000. Other awardees included Rappahannock 4-H ($7,500), the Rappahannock Historical Society ($5,000), the Headwaters Foundation’s Starfish Mentoring and Project: Read programs ($4,600), Kid Pan Alley ($3,250), the Rappahannock Food Pantry ($3,000) and the Rappahannock County High School Band ($1,640).

The announcement this week marked the NPCF’s first formal, application-based cycle of grant awards from the fund established with a roughly $2 million bequest from Lykes, an economist and researcher-turned-photojournalist who died in 2009 – by which time he’d developed an abiding and well-documented love of his adopted home county.

“Richard Lykes loved Rappahannock County,” NPCF executive director Cole Johnson said in brief remarks at an awards reception at Washington’s Blue Rock Inn Thursday night. “With his generous bequest to NPCF, he ensures that his beloved Rappahannock will continue to blossom and thrive, just the way it does in so many of his fabulous photographs.”

NPCF, which operates in Culpeper, Fauquier, Madison and Rappahannock counties, made a single distribution from the Lykes fund last year – $25,000 toward the rebuilding of a playground at Rappahannock County Elementary School.

NPCF’s current board chairman John McCarthy, who is also Rappahannock’s county administrator, said the foundation has planned from the start to turn Lykes’ bequest into a self-sustaining endowment. This year’s grants total was calculated, based on investment returns over the last three years, to allow the fund to soon sustain an annual grant distribution of about $100,000, McCarthy said.

The grant recipients, projects and awards are as follows:

Hearthstone School, $500 computer projector for classrooms: purchase of a projector to enhance a teacher’s ability to enliven classroom lessons with visual aids.

Virginia Foundation for Ag in the Classroom, $916, for its “Agriculture in the Classroom Literacy Project.”

RCHS Band/Band Boosters, $1,640, for “A Complete Score Study/Analysis of  Mussogorsky’s ‘Pictures at an Exhibition,’ including a trip to Boston to see a performance of the piece by the Boston Symphony, and a performance at a band contest there.

Culpeper Regional Hospital Foundation, $2,000, for a project to create binders developed by the hospital’s patient advocacy committee to aid cancer patients in understanding their diagnoses.

Rappahannock Food Pantry, $3,000, for a second climate-controlled shed to store food.

Kid Pan Alley, $3,250, to help fund a two-week Kid Pan Alley songwriting workshop for second-  and third-graders and a community concert.

Headwaters Foundation, $4,600 for its Starfish Mentoring and Project: Read programs.

American Red Cross, $5,000, for local research and tracking for its “Disaster Relief Services: Preparedness, Response and Recovery” program.

Fauquier Health Foundation, $5,000, for its three-year “Telemonitoring at Home: A Key to Chronic Disease Management in Rappahannock County” project.

Rappahannock Historical Society, $5,000, for digitization and electronic preservation and cataloging of the society’s collections of historical documents, books and other media related to Rappahannock’s history.

Rappahannock 4-H Clubs, $7,500, for new 4-H workshops during the school year and four summer travel camps.

Child Care and Learning Center, $10,000, to help fund daycare costs for low-income families, provide fresh and healthy food at the center and help pay for sewer hookup and replace a heat pump.

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