Local firm wins top state ASLA honors 

The Virginia Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects (VA-ASLA) named Rappahannock architects Jay Monroe and Rosa Crocker as 2013 Honor Award winners in Residential Landscape Architecture for their project “Windrush.”

The award-winning Windrush project, after Monroe and Crocker and their local crew finished the job. Photo by Bill Mauzy.
The award-winning Windrush project, after Monroe and Crocker and their local crew finished the job. Photo by Bill Mauzy.

Award winners, selected by North Carolina professional peers, were presented May 11 during VA-ASLA’s annual meeting in Richmond. Windrush was a big hit at the show, drawing comments calling it “truly transformative,” with “quirky, unexpected, unique details with common materials” and “an amazing piece of art . . . almost intoxicating.”

“We’re pleased to share credit in this award with staff, consultants, contractors and crew members, many local,” said landscape architect and project team leader Crocker. “Despite engineering challenges, national economic crisis and weather delays, project execution ended as a pleasure for all in large part because our patient clients, who keenly appreciate art and the natural world, understand what our profession offers.

Established in the county since 1989, Monroe and Crocker offer professionally licensed, inter-disciplinary services throughout the Piedmont in landscape architecture, site planning and architecture.

The entry courtyard at Windrush features locally sourced materials and native plantings. Photo by Bill Mauzy.
The entry courtyard at Windrush features locally sourced materials and native plantings. Photo by Bill Mauzy.

“Because we prefer to draw from local talent and resources for projects, our work benefits the local community, as well as clients and our practice. We look forward to continuing over 60 cumulative years of professional experience, working collaboratively to achieve results as successful as Windrush.”

Together with Liz Oliver of Monroe and Crocker, other key Windrush project contributors include general contractor Lucky McCoy; Kevin Creany, Earthworks Landscaping Company; Rory Melanson, RSM Excavating; Scott Evans, County Farm Service; Chris Poland, F&G Paving; and photographer Bill Mauzy.

Monroe and Crocker’s work at Windrush, which overlooks the Rush River, helped realize the potential of a design-build project originated by architect Donald Reed Chandler – an elegant Asian teahouse-form house set in a narrow, wooded, river valley – integrating and harmonizing structure and setting through development of a site design.

Landscape stewardship measures included repairing damage from prior construction activity, correcting runoff, erosion and other functional problems, minimizing maintenance demands, protecting and framing views, removing invasive species, preserving and augmenting the native plant palette, and employing locally sourced organic and recycled materials.

The VA-ASLA’s bi-annual Professional and Student Awards Program recognizes excellence, exemplary performance and significant contributions in landscape architecture in Virginia, encouraging the application of visionary and progressive solutions to issues, problems and opportunities challenging landscape architects, and providing a forum for review and evaluation of work currently shaping our environment. Detailed looks at Windrush and other winning projects can be found at vaasla.org.

The Windrush property as seen from the upper crossing, with the Rush River below. Photo by Bill Mauzy.
The Windrush property as seen from the upper crossing, with the Rush River below. Photo by Bill Mauzy.

Landscape architects are licensed and highly trained in a range of analysis, planning, design, engineering, horticultural, graphic and written skills. Residential design constitutes just one aspect of practice, with projects ranging from feasibility studies to inventories, and master planning through construction of public, commercial, institutional, park, recreational, campus and other open space sites, greenways, trails, streetscapes, parking, roadways, environmental, historic or cultural resource conservation, and viewshed protection across many landscapes and communities, from city to village, rural, wild and scenic. For more information, visit asla.org.

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