The Rapp for Oct. 2

If you Dig Pink enough, he’ll kiss the mule

This week is Dig Pink week for J.V. and varsity volleyball at Rappahannock County High School. As part of the Side-Out Foundation’s annual nationwide Dig Pink breast cancer rally, the Panther girls play at 6 p.m. today and tomorrow (Oct. 2-3) at the RCHS gym.

RCHS athletic director Jimmy Swindler promises to give a big kiss to a mule Friday night if enough folks come out to support the volleyball girls’ Dig Pink rally.Courtesy photo
RCHS athletic director Jimmy Swindler promises to give a big kiss to a mule Friday night if enough folks come out to support the volleyball girls’ Dig Pink rally.

Head out and show your support for the volleyball teams — and for the fight against breast cancer, with raffles and other ways to help the teams reach their goal. (When they do, athletic director Jimmy Swindler has promised to kiss a mule in the gym Friday night. He’s kissed a pig and a goat after successful Dig Pink rallies before, so don’t worry, he’ll be fine. Although the pig never calls.)

Don’t forget to wear pink to the games — and if you want to know more about what the Side-Out Foundation is up to, check out the excellent and moving “Side-Out Story” documentary online at youtube.com/watch?v=YWII9pilahQ.

The J.V. team’s Dig Pink game is Monday (Oct. 6). For more information about the teams and rally, call Janet Robey at 540-222-4412.

Amissville’s past, conservation’s future

A couple of happenings worth noting this weekend:

The first is the Rappahannock Historical Society’s History of Amissville program — presentations by historians and others in the know on Amissville’s storied past — starting at 2 p.m. Sunday (Oct. 5) at the Amissville Methodist Church on Lee Highway. You’re invited to bring your own Amissville photos or other items (including stories) to share; a $10 donation is asked, and refreshments follow the program. For more information, call 540-675-1163 or email rapphistsoc@comcast.net.

The black-footed ferret is among the endangered species you might catch a glimpse of at SCBI's open house.Michael J. Lockhart, USFWS, via Wikimedia Commons
The black-footed ferret is among the endangered species you might catch a glimpse of at SCBI’s open house.

The second is the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute’s annual open house — now called the Autumn Conservation Festival — which is 10 to 3 both Saturday and Sunday at SCBI, on Remount Road off U.S. 522 in Front Royal. Since SCBI is usually closed to the public, the festival offers visitors a chance to see rare and endangered animals, get a tour of SCBI’s bird collection and see the new George Mason University research and education campus. There’s also games, live music, food and more. Passes are $30 cash at the gate (limit six people per car; $5 per each additional passenger). For more information, visit nationalzoo.si.edu.

Old Rag Gallery focuses on trees

This poster by Francie Schroeder describes 16 reasons, beauty included, to plant trees.
This poster by Francie Schroeder describes 16 reasons, beauty included, to plant trees.

With all that went on last weekend in Rappahannock, you might have missed the opening of Old Rag Gallery’s latest exhibit — a show of tree-inspired work by photographers Joyce Harman, Geoffrey Archer, Francie Schroeder and Bette Hileman at the gallery, which is inside River District Arts at 3 River Ln.

While you’re there, if you haven’t yet, it’s time to check out the tapas and other Spanish cuisine at El Quijote restaurant. And to introduce yourself to RDA’s new artistic director Rebecca Quinn, herself a working artist, by way of the Corcoran Gallery and School of Design + Art, who joins the rest of the working-artist crew with visitor-friendly studios at RDA.

A word from the ‘Headmattress’

Bill Dietel speaks Oct. 10.
Bill Dietel speaks Oct. 10.

At 8 p.m. Friday (Oct. 10) at Rappahannock County Library, Rappahannock’s own Bill Dietel will speak at the Second Friday at the Library series. Dietel, an acclaimed storyteller, will recount his days as head of the nation’s oldest boarding school for girls, in the turbulent 1960s. His rollicking account, which he calls “Trials and Triumphs of a Headmattress,” is sponsored by the Rappahannock Association for the Arts and the Community (RAAC).

Dietel is an educator and philanthropist. A historian by training, he has worked in philanthropy for nearly 50 years. His interests span a broad range, but he has devoted particular attention to public education in the county, public policy and small-scale, sustainable agriculture.

The talk is free. All are welcome. For more information, visit raac.org.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Staff/Contributed
About Staff/Contributed 4260 Articles
The Rappahannock News welcomes contributions from any and all members of the community. Email news and photos to editor@rappnews.com or call us at 540-675-3338.