Cashing in at Belvoir Recycling

Putting the “monster grappler” through its paces loading scrap metal into a container truck at Belvoir Recycling.Courtesy Photo
Putting the “monster grappler” through its paces loading scrap metal into a container truck at Belvoir Recycling.

Belvoir Recycling, located in Belvoir, an unincorporated hamlet on Route 709 just south of Route 55 between Marshall and The Plains, offers cash for your scrap metal and many other recyclable items. Converting the junk on your property to cash can be a great incentive for spring cleaning. And now’s the time, before you’re overwhelmed by greenery.

Proprietors Luke and Austin Hazel were just finishing college when they came up with the idea to start a second family business on the property. In 2000, their father, Doug Hazel, bought the former junkyard, dating back to the 1920s, and established Belvoir Station LLC, using recycled railroad containers as storage units. Luke and Austin launched Belvoir Recycling in 2010.

“We grew up with recycling and it’s really important for our generation and the next generation to make sure we have a cleaner earth,” said Austin.

The scrap metal from Belvoir Recycling ends up anywhere in the U.S. or the world. Supply and demand determine the price per pound. China and various European countries use scrap metal in the construction of bridges, buildings, stadiums, appliances and cars, but in recent years they have slowed down in terms of production. Domestically, the price has been impacted by the sluggish world economy.

Brothers Austin (left) and Luke Hazel, founders of Belvoir Recycling, believe “it’s really important for our generation and the next generation to make sure we have a cleaner earth.” Courtesy photo
Brothers Austin (left) and Luke Hazel, founders of Belvoir Recycling, believe “it’s really important for our generation and the next generation to make sure we have a cleaner earth.”

“For several years, it was a pretty good “cash crop,” but there’s been a gradual decline globally in the demand for scrap metal and that caused a decline in the price paid for it. Then, in the last couple of months, the price dropped a lot,” said Luke, the older brother by one year. “Now, it’s more about people thinking that recycling is a good way to get the junk off their land.”

While some prefer to wait and see if the price improves before they cash in their scrap, others just want to get rid of it. Items accepted at Belvoir Recycling include household appliances, cars and car parts, pipe, stainless steel sinks, tanks, pool equipment, lead acid batteries, farm equipment, metal roofing and fencing materials, lawn and garden machinery, and lots more.

The Hazels will not accept any hazardous materials. You’re on the right track if you think in terms of beer and soda cans, farm implements and machinery, defunct washers and dryers. The two brothers, who are readily available by phone during business hours (8 to 4:30 weekdays, 8 to 11:30 Saturdays), provide knowledgeable and friendly customer service.

“We’re doing more dealing in used auto parts,” said Luke. “We get cars in and put them online on eBay, Craigslist and the Valley Trader and we get a fair amount of business by word of mouth. People know we’re here and ask if we have a particular make of car. We offer ‘pick your own part’ service on most late model vehicles that come in for scrap and the vehicles we purchase at Insurance Auto Auctions. Sometimes we get a car that’s old or a wreck, but the tires are nearly new. We’re working on a new website for cars.”

The Hazel brothers are very familiar with running titles through the DMV and NMVTIS (National Motor Vehicle Title Information System). They accept recyclable parts from auto repair businesses and purchase catalytic converters from reputable sources. They charge a fee to recycle tires.

The entire Belvoir campus adheres to environmental regulations and, in the back, resembles a park area with the most luxurious grass in season around the pond created by their storm drain. Ecologically, Belvoir is a model for sustainable industry that doesn’t harm the local fauna and flora.  

“We play by the rules and follow all the regulations,” said Austin.

One category that hasn’t gone down in price is aluminum. Next time you have a party or are involved in a big social or community event, make sure that you have plenty of well-marked recycle containers for the beer and soda cans.

Turning your scrap metal into cash is very simple. Load up your pick-up truck or flatbed trailer. Hit the road and pull up to the Belvoir gate. One of the Hazels will press the button and the gate slides open. You drive in, stop and hand your government-issued ID (valid driver’s license with photo is fine) to Luke or Austin, who put it through the scanner. Perhaps you chat before driving up to the state-of-the-art, 80-foot Avery Weigh-Tronix commercial scale.

After the computerized system records the weight, you drive to the back corner of the “Belvoir Recycling Campus” and empty your truck or flatbed trailer with the help of Luke or Austin on one of their big machines. Minutes later, you return to the scale where the now emptied truck’s weight gets recorded again. The last stop is the office. One of the Hazels finalizes the transaction, prints out a receipt, and hands over the paperwork, ID and cash.

The Hazels provide a public service with their Avery Weigh-Tronix: many farmers weigh their cattle on the scales and get a ticket printed, no charge, so they know exactly what they’re selling. The Hazels weigh livestock, feed, sileage, whatever. Sometimes truckers use Belvoir Recycling’s scale to check gross vehicle weight. The scale is checked twice every year for accuracy.

Recycling is a win-win situation. People can clean up their property, outbuildings or garages and convert eyesore junk to cash. Check the website for what’s accepted and be sure to call if you have questions.

For more information, visit scrapva.com or call 540-253-5006.

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