Down Memory Lane for July 7 

May 30, 1963

John Warner, principal of Washington Elementary School, has submitted his resignation to Rappahannock County School Board effective June 7. Mr. Warner has been principal here for the past two years.

He will teach at the Patrick Henry Elementary School in the city of Alexandria during the 1963-64 session. There he will instruct mathematics and physical education in a departmentalized seventh grade. After this Mr. Warner hopes to get back into school administration.

While principal at the school in Rappahannock Mr. Warner was instrumental in acquiring special reading classes and with the assistance of C.B. Palmer and the local Vo-Ag classes from the high school made marked improvements in the school grounds. For the first time in many years the school boasts a lawn instead of a vast expanse of red dirt.

The Rappahannock Library on Gay Street, Washington will be open all day the 4th of July and will be the site of a county wide exhibition of historic papers, documents, letters, maps, etc., which can be found pertaining to the Colonial and Antebellum periods of the Virginia Piedmont area and particularly of what is now Rappahannock County.

This is a real opportunity for the people of Rappahannock to bring out those old historic keepsakes and share them with others through your new and beautifully restored library.

Everyone is asked to search old chests, attic trunks and desks for any of the following; Historic writings, documents, maps, surveys newspapers, programs, sale bills, sketches, paintings and prints of people and places of Rappahannock, prior to the Civil War.

Anyone in possession of any of the above and kind enough to lend them for exhibition please bring to the library or call Mrs. Arthur Miller.

Dec. 6, 1962: In production: Pictured is the first trial run on the new web offset reproduction printing press on which this week a Rappahannock News was printed. The versatile machine has high-speed capacity with a top speed of 24,000 newspapers per hour, printing up to 12 pages per run in black and white as well as “spot” and “process” colors.
Dec. 6, 1962: In production: Pictured is the first trial run on the new web offset reproduction printing press on which this week a Rappahannock News was printed. The versatile machine has high-speed capacity with a top speed of 24,000 newspapers per hour, printing up to 12 pages per run in black and white as well as “spot” and “process” colors.

Dorothy E.  Payne and Douglas Atkins, seniors at Rappahannock County High School were awarded the “I Dare You” Danforth Foundation Incentive Award last week. This award is made in recognition of leadership, scholarship, and high moral standards, to students who develop their potential. It is a challenge to seniors to think tall, stand tall and act tall. The school principal and guidance counselor make the selection.

May 5, 1977

It is most  interesting to note that the newspaper business in Rappahannock County is now 100 years old. Also interesting is the fact that the first newspaper in the county, and the one that exists today, share the same name: Rappahannock News.

The Rappahannock News of 1877, of which, unfortunately, no known copies exist, was published by J.R. Grove of Lonaconing, Maryland. The enterprise lasted only one year. Grove became involved with politics, working on the congressional campaign of Warrentonian Eppa Hunton, and subsequently left Rappahannock to continue his career as a printer for the Federal Government.

By 1878 another newspaper, The Blue Ridge Echo, opened for business. The Echo, which was published by Judge W.W. Moffett of Rappahannock, was printed for four years.

About this time, a third newspaper was published, known simply as “The Call.” The only proof of its existence is that it is mentioned in county records as having carried legal proceedings. It is speculated that “The Call” was printed outside of Rappahannock and brought in after printing. Nothing is recorded about “The Call” after 1886.

The Blue Ridge Guide, which was printed from 1886 to 1936, had two publishers: The originator of the newspaper, W.B. Settle, and George W. Cary, who worked for Mr. Settle as a printer and assumed the duties of publisher after Mr. Settle’s death.

In 1889 George Cary  purchased the Blue Ridge Guide from the estate, and published the paper for a continuous 47 years, until poor health forced him to retire. His death meant the end of Blue Ridge Guide, and no newspapers were published in Rappahannock for 13 years.

The grant application from the Rappahannock Recreation Center for funds to build a swimming pool and tennis courts at the recreation pavilion outside Washington was turned down by HUD, according to Chairman T. Granville Eastham. But plans are to try again. “We’ll submit the same application year after year,” said Eastham, until efforts meet with success. Granville Eastham was optimistic on the swimming pool and tennis court grant’s chances for approval next year in view of the improved condition of state finances. According to Eastham, recent statements by Gov. Mills Godwin show Virginia going from $30 million in debt to a $30 million surplus during the first quarter of the current year. Eastham felt that if this economic trend continues, the funding   application will have a better chance of being granted in the coming year.

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