Down Memory Lane for July 14 

Aug. 29, 1963

The Rappahannock National Bank this week aided the American Embassy in ascertaining the ownership of a checkbook found on the streets of Rome, Italy.

The checkbook arrived at the bank via airmail registered certified mail with no name and address with a letter from the embassy stating it had been found on the street and turned over to the police authorities.

Mrs. C. T. Bruce proved the real sleuth when she deduced that the handwriting and the checks given in Hong Kong, Shanghai, Bombay, Cairo and Jerusalem and Athens could only belong to Normie Davis. Upon consulting with Normie’s father, George H. Davis Jr., the cashier of the bank C. J. Miller found that Normie had written her father of her loss and had asked that the bank be notified to honor no checks on her account from Rome. She stated that her pockets had been picked and that she lost about $10 in addition to the checkbook but that fortunately her traveler’s checks were not stolen. She asked that another checkbook be sent to her in London and her own checkbook was on its way this week.

Ann Baumgardner, seven year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. F. M. Baumgardner of Bellevue Farm near Washington, thought she was picnicking alone near her home in Harris Hollow last Monday when she suddenly realized she had company. Ann saw what she had thought was a brown rag in the grass about two feet from her begin to move. Realizing it was a snake the youngster called her mother, who came armed with a rock and hoe. She struck the reptile with both before it slithered away.

Four days later the 42-inch rattlesnake was found dead in some tall grass approximately 20 feet from where it was fatally wounded. Ann has the 13 rattles for a memento.

July 21, 1977

Haywood Johnson of Washington, D.C., comes from his home about every three weeks to get water from the mountain spring near Panorama to take home. He used to buy distilled water for 99 cents a gallon to avoid consuming the chemicals necessary in the city water supply. He fills the trunk of his car with gallon jugs.
Haywood Johnson of Washington, D.C., comes from his home about every three weeks to get water from the mountain spring near Panorama to take home. He used to buy distilled water for 99 cents a gallon to avoid consuming the chemicals necessary in the city water supply. He fills the trunk of his car with gallon jugs.

The Rappahannock Board of Zoning Appeals voted unanimously at last Thursday’s “on again-off again” meeting to revoke the special use permit issued to P.E. Steve DeMent III on the grounds that DeMent failed to meet conditions attached to the permit.

According to County Zoning Administrator Evan McNear, the next step in legal action against DeMent may be to file suit for violation of county ordinances. Then it will be up to the judge to take action to bring DeMent into compliance, possibly by requiring that he tear down the offending structure, said McNear.

According to the minutes, DeMent’s special use permit was “discussed in detail” and BZA members concluded that Dement was in violation of his permit, granted on April 14 for the purpose of adding to the present structure on his property in Sperryville. The permit stipulated that the 70 foot long, 40 foot wide addition be set back 50 feet from both Route 522 and the adjoining property.

To many people, Old Faithful is the well-known geyser of Yellowstone National Park, projecting a jet of hot water into the air every six minute. But midway up the mountain toward Virginia’s Skyline Drive, Rappahannock’s own Old Faithful is more important, more interesting and by far a more valuable resource than any periodic display of our western national park. Shenandoah National Park’s Old Faithful is a never-failing gushing artesian spring that pours out its invigorating treasure with utter extravagance. Lacking any glitter of the spectacular, its charm lies in the steady dependable supply of crystal clear water — symbolic evidence of God’s generosity to mankind. Legend has masked all attempts to discover the source, as if the simple gushing supply were sufficient evidence of good will. (Editor’s Note: Rappahannock’s Old Faithful has long since been sealed by the park service.)

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