Down Memory Lane for Sept. 1

April 25, 1984

Sam Snead, local partner in the proposed Rappahannock Center for Independent Living, has scheduled an informational meeting tonight at the courthouse, beginning at 7:30.

State and local officials will be on hand to answer questions regarding the sewage disposal system intended to serve the group home for the elderly planned for the old ski area site in Harris Hollow. In a letter dated April 20 and addressed to neighboring landowners in the hollow, Snead explained that the meeting will provide an opportunity “to discuss what is being planned and voice what concerns you may have about waste water disposal.

A recovering economy that has sparked construction activity and land sales and pushed the Aileen Sewing Plant, Rappahannock’s largest single employer, back to full production and full staff has apparently brushed Rappahannock’s agricultural industry as well.

“Farmers are buying more fertilizer, they’re buying more seeds, they’re redoing pastures, they’re buying more of everything,” reported Gordon Thornhill, manager of the Rappahannock Farmers’ Cooperative. While he declined to put a dollar or percentage figure on the recent increase in co-op business, he acknowledged that “things look pretty good for the year,” judging by the first quarter of 1984. “January and February are normally slow months but we’ve been much busier this year… It looks like agriculture is coming back to where it was in 1981. Things are up for the first three quarters.

Three hundred and sixty-nine runners massed at the start in Flint Hill last Saturday morning. Thirty two minutes and twenty seconds later, Steve Pinard of Hartwood broke the tape in Washington, setting a new record for the 10 Kilometer Fodderstack Classic. Betty Settle duplicated her performance of last year, again claiming the Eva L. Smith Memorial for the first Rappahannock woman to finish in the Fodderstack Classic. She also won the 30-34 women’s division. Grace Sims, county librarian, proved she knows racing as well as books on Saturday as she took first place in the Fodderstack’s 60 and over division with a time of 89:18.

Nov. 14, 2001

It’s been 18 months since the purchase of the Sperryville Corner Store (Est. 1850), and now the Thornton River Group announces Phase II: The grand opening of the Corner Boutique.

Baggarly's Mill, also known as Calvert Mill, Washington Mill and Avon Mill, is a gristmill dating from 1777 to 1779. It sit on a site above the Rush River just outside of Washington. It is thought to have served as a neutral trading spot during the Civil War. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.Courtesy of Rappahannock Historical Society
Baggarly’s Mill, also known as Calvert Mill, Washington Mill and Avon Mill, is a gristmill dating from 1777 to 1779. It sit on a site above the Rush River just outside of Washington. It is thought to have served as a neutral trading spot during the Civil War. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

The Corner Boutique will kick off its grand opening on Saturday, Nov. 17 with a 25 percent store wide discount. The boutique is the endeavor of partner Dana Thompson, former high school English teacher and native of Dallas, Texas.

With the Boutique, she seeks to add a new dimension to retail shopping in the quaint village of Sperryville. The boutique offers unique clothing, accessories and gifts, and ia as diverse as the residents of Rappahannock County.

In a prepared statement, Michael Leake, Executive Vice President and CEO of the Rappahannock National Bank, announced that the bank had identified a suitable location in one of the county’s designated commercial areas and would there construct a new banking facility that will “clearly define our commitment to our customers, employees and community…”

He noted that the bank will be celebrating its centennial anniversary in 2002, and the statement implied that the new facility will be ready for service at that time.

The prospective move of the bank to a commercial zone on U.S. 211 is, certainly in part, a direct result of the difficulty that the bank has had in obtaining a permit from the Town of Washington to expand its existing facilities and to add a drive-in window. The bank first announced its desire to install a drive-in window in its Washington facility in January of 2001 and, at at Town Council meeting shortly thereafter, some of the Town’s residents telegraphed their opposition to any such proposal.

Other residents foresaw the results of that opposition — Mitzie Young, for one, warned of the possibility of the bank relocating out of the Town if they cannot expand by adding automated tellers.

It appears as though Mrs. Young was on target with her warning, and it looks like the Rappahannock Bank will move — at least their main operations.

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