Down Memory Lane for Nov. 17

Nov. 22, 1984

Families across the United States traditionally spend Thanksgiving together surrounded by good food and the warmth of family love. Ethel and Ed Bailey of Washington are no exceptions to that tradition, although their Thanksgiving is literally filled with family.

The Baileys will have been married 53 years this December 28, and this year they will celebrate Thanksgiving with over 30 members of their family. “We’ll have at least 30 here if I don’t ask anyone else to come,” Ethel said.

Ethel and her daughter Marie usually do all the cooking for the family’s Thanksgiving Day dinner.

The men in the family have a different Thanksgiving routine. Ed and the rest of the men usually go hunting early in the morning on Thanksgiving Day, come in for breakfast and church, eat dinner and then watch football games on TV.

The children in the family play games during the day, and the older children go across the street to Marie’s house to listen to music and dance. “I usually talk with my sisters and catch up on everything that’s been happening during the year,” Marie said.

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Bachi of Woodville discovered an appropriate note in their backyard on Nov. 15, the day of the Great American Smokeout. A postcard, tied to a balloon that had burst and fallen onto their lawn, read: “I don’t like smoking because it kills you and gives you cancer. It’s very dangerous to your health.” The note was signed by Sue Allen, Grade 4, North Franklin School, Washington, Pa.

“I was aware of the day. That’s why I thought this was so newsworthy,” Mr. Bachi said. He added that he thought it was particularly interesting that the balloon landed so closely to Washington, Va. There was no date on the postcard telling when the fresh-air message was launched. Mr. Bachi promptly returned the postcard to the school, however.

Nov. 21, 2002

Nov. 14, 2002: Adrianne Moore, Gregory Flournoy and Morgan Flournoy drink from the family spring located on Ivy Cliffs Farm in Harris Hollow, Washington. This farm was purchased by their great-great-great-great -grandfather, Richard Harris II on Sept. 29, 1807. This farm is now owned by Adrianne's mother, Diane DeBergh Moore.Rappahannock News file photo
Nov. 14, 2002: Adrianne Moore, Gregory Flournoy and Morgan Flournoy drink from the family spring located on Ivy Cliffs Farm in Harris Hollow, Washington. This farm was purchased by their great-great-great-great -grandfather, Richard Harris II on Sept. 29, 1807. This farm is now owned by Adrianne’s mother, Diane DeBergh Moore.

When Jessica Stout started to knit in the first grade she literally had no idea that in just four short years, she would attain the world’s longest finger knitting goal.

Finger knitting is the art of creating a chain stitch with your fingers without using knitting needles or crocheting hooks.

Since that time Jessica has produced hundreds of yards of finger knitting, Jessica and her family had no idea what to do with the finished product. They tried using it as doll hair and with other arts and craft projects, however, the enormous ball of knitting never seem to disappear.

The last year in February, while in the fourth grade, jessica had an idea to find out what the world record was for finger knitting. She could find no information on the website and decided to email the Guinness Book of World Records. They replied that no such record existed. Thus the idea was planted in Jessica’s mind.

On Feb. 18, 2002, Jessica Stout set herself a goal, to finger knit one mile. Seeking permission from her parents and teachers Jessica began to knit.

On Oct. 28, 2002, acting as official witnesses for the measuring were Mrs. Raye Tupper, principal of Rappahannock County Elementary School and Mrs. Amy Saxton, Jessica’s fifth grade teacher. The official measurer was Earl Budd from New Baltimore. The actual measuring took place at RCES in the gymnasium.  Jessica had a goal of 5,280 feet and at the final measuring her string reached an amazing 7,086 feet and eight inches.

Mary Ann Kuhn withdrew her application for a zoning ordinance amendment that would create a “bed and breakfast inn” category in the Town of Washington. In her letter of Nov. 12 to Mayor Stewart Willis and the members of the Town Council, Ms. Kuhn advised that she was withdrawing her application “at this time,” and added that she will revisit the issue at a more appropriate time.

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