Of time and the river

For this was the bloody Rappahannock line that divided Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia and the multi-headed Army of the Potomac, the line that served to separate Richmond and Washington. In some senses it was an artificial line.
Fractured: 1968, a year like no other

The way one views 1968 says less about the year itself than about the viewer’s personality and politics. A Rorschach test for what you value. A prism through which all other years are viewed.
As the world turns and the stones speak…

Sex! Violence! War! Beheadings! Genocide! Climate change! All that and more, here in pastoral, otherwise peaceful Rappahannock County — at 5 p.m. Sunday, June 5, at Stone Hill Amphitheater in Flint Hill, for the world premiere of John Henry’s “Arguing…
Reflections on Rappahannock…

In the interest of community-sharing and in the second of an occasional series, Rappahannock News’ Walter Nicklin does a Q&A with Bill Fletcher of Sperryville.
Of stones and words

Rappahannock County is blessed with an abundance of interesting individuals doing interesting things, often not widely known. In the interest of community-sharing and in the first of an occasional series, Rappahannock News’ Walter Nicklin does a Q&A with Flint Hill’s…
Letter from across ‘The Pond’

Here in Paris — France, not Virginia — there’s a wind turbine on the Place de la Concorde, chunks of Greenland ice melting in front of the Pantheon, and stationary, clean-energy bicycles that strollers are invited to pedal in order…
Editorial: At one with the earth, at last

Conservation easements and wildlife habitat, subjects of recent Rappahannock News stories, are not the only ways to preserve the county’s open spaces. Here’s another: conservation burial!
Editorial: What’s in a name?

So who named Rappahannock’s county seat “Little Washington?” It must have been recent immigrants from in and around that much bigger Washington, using the Nation’s Capital as a point of reference, right?
Editorial: Where there’s smoke …

Where there’s smoke, there’s not only fire but also concern: Visible smoke from your chimney means your fire isn’t burning as efficiently or cleanly as it could, and air quality — and thus your health — are at stake.