Wakefield Country Day will live to educate another academic year

Hours after warning of potential closing, Flint Hill private school secures ‘initial capital’

Wakefield’s owl mascot greets parade goers during the Christmas in Little Washington celebration. File photo

Note: After developments this weekend, a follow-up story is here

Hours after the board of directors of Wakefield Country Day School informed WCDS families that absent a “sudden influx of capital” the prestigious private school in Flint Hill would close at the end of this academic year and the chair of its board says required funding has suddenly materialized.

“We have the initial capital needed right now to continue,” Brett Haynes said in a telephone interview Friday with the Rappahannock News.

Whereas on Wednesday evening the WCDS community was informed in a two-page letter that despite 22 months of diligent efforts “we have not been successful . . .  garnering additional funding to offset our enrollment loss.”

“In February it looked as if we had a number of new domestic students and international students in the pipeline that would ensure more stability next year, but within the past two weeks it has become apparent that our numbers are not going to rebound and could be even lower than they are this year,” the board of directors told WCDS families.

“Thus, after reviewing every possible option, the only responsible decision the Board can make, in the absence of a sudden influx of capital before May 9, 2019 from the Auction [this Saturday], the Give Local Piedmont [May 7], and an outpouring of donations from friends of Wakefield near and far, is to close Wakefield Country Day School at the end of this academic year.”

The board said that by choosing to shut down the school now, “we know we have the funds and assets available to repay all families who already have put down deposits or paid tuition in full. We would also be giving our much-deserving faculty and staff time to seek positions elsewhere so that they can continue to support their families.

“Needless to say, we are heartbroken by the decision we have had to make. This was not a decision that we took lightly.”

But reached by this newspaper some 36 hours later, Haynes said previously elusive funding has suddenly been pledged to keep WCDS afloat for another year and hopefully beyond.

“What you’ve got in the Wakefield community family is an extreme amount of passion, commitment and loyalty towards the school, which means so much to so many people — parents, students, alumni, faculty, staff,” he explained. When that is the case, the chair explained, “amazing things can be accomplished.”

Haynes, the principal broker at Oak Crest Commercial Real Estate in Winchester who graduated from WCDS in 1984, said “additional capital” was pledged to “stabilize the financial situation of the school to continue forward, and that is where we are right now.”

He did not identify the funding source or sources, but confirmed it satisfied the “$1.5 to $2 million [required] to stabilize [the school] to move forward into the future.”

“Wakefield is an amazing place and we all want to see it survive,” said Haynes. “And hopefully all this passion will continue.”

WCDS is the fifth largest employer in Rappahannock County, just behind the Rappahannock County government.

With that in mind, the chair said he hopes the entire county realizes WCDS’s “benefit to the community and helps support it . . . as an asset to not only Rappahannock but also surrounding communities. It means a lot to so many people.”

While funds are now secured to keep the school operating at least for the foreseeable future, Haynes conceded in the telephone interview that “cleary other things need to be answered” to sustain WCDS — founded in 1972 — in the years to come.

In the letter Wednesday evening, the directors explained that in order for the school to operate without having to raise additional funds it had to enroll “at least 200 students.”

“The last time enrollment numbers were at that level was in 2014,” the board stated. “We knew that 2018 was going to be a challenging year with 25 seniors graduating, but what we did not expect, and had not planned on, was the significant decline in our international student population beginning in 2017. This international pool of students, usually numbering 22-24, not only added cultural diversity over the years to our school but also helped to sustain us financially.”

The board added that WCDS has never before had to “recruit” international students, “for we had agencies and a school in Japan that sent applications our way regularly. It was not even unusual for us to turn some students away.”

But in 2017, WCDS was informed by academic placement agencies that “their students would no longer be studying in the U.S.; they would be studying in Canada and Australia instead. Furthermore, in 2017 China aggressively began implementation of a policy designed to replace foreign study for its youth by providing new schools at home.”

Furthermore, the board said it realizes “we are located in a county with a dwindling population whose own public schools are facing enrollment challenges and know as well that in the past five years, five independent schools in our surrounding areas have faced similar challenges and have had to close.

“In February, it looked as if we had a number of new domestic students and international students in the pipeline that would ensure more stability next year, but within the past two weeks, it has become apparent that our numbers are not going to rebound and could be even lower than they are this year . . .”

Thus, closing the school in the coming weeks, “assuming we do not receive an influx of new capital, is in the best interest of all, and Mrs. Pamela Lynn Tucker, co-founder of the school, has expressed her gratitude for the 46 years the school has been able to be the example of excellence in education for all other schools. She is proud of her legacy and thankful to all of you who have chosen WCDS for your children.”

On Thursday morning, Welby Lynn Griffin, the daughter of Mrs. Tucker and her late husband, William, wrote to the WCDS community that the sudden word of the school’s potential closing caught her off guard “in the middle of my youngest son’s 9th birthday celebration.

“Never did I dream that I would spend the same evening blowing out the candles on an institution that has been like a parent, sibling, and child to me — and just as dear as any of those,” Griffin wrote. “The closing [of] the school is even more painful for me on a personal level because this institution has been my most tangible tie to a father I lost at age 10.

“Watching his life’s labors crumble is like watching my father die all over again, but this time in a way that hurts more than his actual death. That is because this place meant more to him than his life, and he would have happily given one to see the other endure.”

Griffin added: “Indeed, it is easy in this moment of shock and grief to turn next to anger. And while I wish that things had been handled and conveyed to us differently, I do not believe that anger and finger-pointing is what will give us any chance of keeping my parent’s dream, which has always been as fragile as it has been beautiful, alive.

“There will be time later for the corporate meeting, for committees to tackle strategic marketing and recruitment, and the soul searching that will be necessary to carry the vision forward in the long term. Now is the moment to consider what this place means to each of us, and then back our feelings up with actions.”

Meanwhile, Haynes told this newspaper in Friday’s interview that the contract with the head of school Jessica Lindstrom expires at the end of this academic year and is up for renewal. He said it is the board’s desire that Lindstrom, who became headmaster in 2012 with more than 30 years in the education field, remain with the school, and directors “expressed we want her to continue.”

Until then, he stressed, “the focus is on the business of the school, where the focus ought to be.”

About John McCaslin 449 Articles
John McCaslin is the editor of the Rappahannock News. Email him at editor@rappnews.com.

16 Comments

  1. It appears to me, after reading all on FB, the Rapp News, and other social media, that a mistake was made. Period. What matters is the truth and in this case, I feel that Dennis is letting his pride get in his way. Everyone makes mistakes and if he actually did record his interview with the Board Chair, then he could prove that he wasn’t reporting inaccurately by simply producing the recording for all to hear and put a stop to all of this. Nobody is infallible. To insist that he did not make a mistake and not provide proof of what he “quoted” is simply ludicrous.

    • Deborah,
      Our reporting was accurate. Period. The board chairman is no longer there and the school has a — hopefully! — positive future. Great story in this week’s paper.

      • Great news, Mr. Brack! I look forward to seeing your story in this week’s paper. I enjoy both your paper and the BRI. I think that in order to know what’s going on in Rappahannock and other areas that one should read both and compare the issues at hand. It’s important, to me, to view all issues from both paper’s perspectives and I find it sad that so many let their prejudice interfere with seeking the truth. Thank you so much for your response and I’m very happy to hear that you were indeed reporting accurately! Keep up the good work!

      • Dennis.
        I’m very happy to see that this issue was cleared up. I didn’t doubt your veracity, but it was difficult to tell whether a mistake had been made or not. It’s great to know, that in spite of all of the doubts, your story was indeed accurate! Apologies are in order, I believe, from all who may have doubted you. You’ve got mine!

  2. Well, Dennis, your story is “as clear as mud.” The News has committed two journalistic sins
    on this one: First, you have terribly complicated this issue, and perhaps negatively affected the
    fundraising effort and secondly, you have become part of the story. And the story is obviously
    still not clarified.

  3. “What we did not expect, and had not planned on, was the significant decline in our international student population beginning in 2017. This international pool of students, usually numbering 22-24, not only added cultural diversity over the years to our school but also helped to sustain us financially.”

    The board added that WCDS has never before had to “recruit” international students, “for we had agencies and a school in Japan that sent applications our way regularly. It was not even unusual for us to turn some students away.”

    But in 2017, WCDS was informed by academic placement agencies that “their students would no longer be studying in the U.S.; they would be studying in Canada and Australia instead. Furthermore, in 2017 China aggressively began implementation of a policy designed to replace foreign study for its youth by providing new schools at home.”

    Is it just a coincidence that agencies that used to send 22-24 international students to WCDS annually abruptly stopped after Trump became President? Or is it likely that this is just another example of how the current administration’s immigration policies are negatively impacting American institutions?

    • Can you actually prove this was because of President Trump, or are you just a typical rumor monger? Also, this article turns out to be fake news. The school is still closing.

    • Last year my husband and I participated in a Chinese immersion program hosted through the local high school that I teach at. We had a young lady stay with us for a few weeks and she attended my school in the winter. Last summer, I took several American students to China through the same program and they had the experience of a lifetime. They traveled to a variety of different cities, tried new cuisine, experienced Chinese opera, practiced calligraphy and the Chinese language, and so much more, We had many wonderful interactions with the Chinese students, teachers and coaches. This year my husband and I planned on hosting another student because our experience was such a positive one last year. Unfortunately, we were told that most of the students had been denied visas for the first time ever. It did not take me long to figure out what had changed since the year before. As a result of the Chinese students being denied visas, our teachers and students will be unable to travel to China this summer. I am very sad that other young adults are missing the chance to travel and all the learning associated with traveling because of bad foreign policy and leadership. With regards to the local private school, I was told by a parent of the school that all the Chinese students withdrew when Trump was elected president. Perhaps someone affiliated with the school can confirm whether or not this is indeed the case.

  4. The Board chair posted on Facebook that this is article is misleading, nowhere near secured funding even though outpouring of interest… you need to clarify…not everyone is on/uses Facebook.

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