Ann Currie Shedding Light
Art

The Rapp for April 19

Besides the Fodderstack . . . Scared of a little rain? Old football injury? Have an even better excuse for not running in Saturday’s Fodderstack 10K, which finishes in Washington? Don’t hide away in shame. […]

Art

Middle Street opens holiday show

The Middle Street Gallery, a 20-person artist’s cooperative based in Washington, will open a special holiday group show on Friday (Dec. 3) that continues through Dec. 19. The gallery will show a number of smaller, […]

Adult Education

Luke on history’s trail

Tired of doing the same old predictable hikes in the Shenandoah National Park, like that well-worn trail up Old Rag Mountain, or that busy path along Whiteoak Canyon? On Nov. 14 get off the beaten […]

History

Rapp Facts

Did you know that . . . a Civil War hero is buried in Flint Hill, but his name is unknown to most people today? According to the Virginia Dept. of Historic Resources, “Pvt. Albert […]

History

Rapp Facts

Did you know that … Ellerslie, just outside of Little Washington on Tiger Valley Road, was once the jewel of the great Rappahannock County estate of John Jett, who owned considerable property south and east […]

History

Rapp Facts

Did you know that … Rappahannock County High School has a world-class band that performs at venues near and far. But years before the Panther Band brought musical fame to the county there were worthy […]

History

Rapp Facts

Did you know that . . . wool was once a big deal in Rappahannock County. More than 23,000 pounds were produced in 1860, and several local mills refined and wove it into finished woolen […]

File photo of Middleton Inn by Jan Clatterbuck/Rappahannock News.
History

Rapp Facts

Did you know that . . . The Middleton Inn, one of Rappahannock County’s fine bed and breakfast establishments, is named for the Washington, Va. property’s first owner, Middleton Miller. But for many years it was known as “The Maples,” for a number of large old trees, some of which stand near the mansion today. Miller, one of the leading citizens of the county, built the house around 1840. He also operated a mill on the Rappahannock River near Waterloo that made “Confederate” gray wool in the first year of the Civil War. […]

History

Rapp Facts

Did you know that . . . What is now Ben Venue was once called Gaines Cross Roads, located at the intersection of the Warrenton-Thornton Gap Turnpike (now U.S. 211) and Richmond Road (Route 729). […]

History

Rapp Facts

Did you know that . . . in 1881 the county issued licenses for the sale of “ardent spirits strong enough to burn” (hard liquor) to Lloyd’s Hotel in Washington, Virginia Hotel in Flint Hill, […]

History

Rapp Facts

Did you know that . . . The building that the county uses as its jail was completed as part of the courthouse complex about 1835. But it is just one of three places that have served as jails over the years. In colonial days, the house at the northeast corner of Main and Calvert streets in Washington served as a lockup. After the Civil War, a third jail — on the Miller farm in the F.T. Valley — housed prisoners destined for court and/or incarceration in the county seat. Shown here, it was the home of Rappahannock Court Justice George Sisk at the time but is now owned by Bill Fletcher.
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History

Rapp Facts

Did you know that . . . Peola Mills was named for the manufacturer of the machinery used in the building?

Mills were once diversified local industries as well as social gathering places. Grinding, distilling, tooling and conversation were done at them. Peola Mills, built around 1794, was one of at least four mills along the Hughes River. Others included the Nethers (still standing), Aylor (between Peola and Nethers) and Walden (further downstream). […]