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150 Years Ago This Week

150 Years Ago This Week: Battle of Waynesboro

In the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia, Maj. Gen. Philip Sheridan sent a force of 10,000 Union cavalry south from Winchester with orders to destroy the Virginia Central Railroad and the James River Canal, take Lynchburg east of the Blue Ridge and then either join forces with Maj. Gen. William Sherman in North Carolina or return to Winchester. […]

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150 Years Ago This Week

150 Years Ago This Week: The peace conference

The three Confederate peace commissioners appointed on Jan. 28 by President Jefferson Davis: Vice President Alexander Stephens, Robert Hunter and John A. Campbell, received a pass issued by President Abraham Lincoln on Jan. 29 to allow them through U.S. military lines to Fortress Monroe, Va. […]

From the Rappahannock News

Is it Washington — or Little Washington?

There has been an enthusiastic online disagreement lately regarding the name of Little Washington, but it turns out the town officially known as Washington, Virginia, has been referred to as Little Washington on and off over the past 150 years or so. […]

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150 Years Ago This Week

150 Years Ago This Week: Major developments

The flamboyant career of a gallant, hard-fighting but often unsuccessful combat officer came to an inglorious end when Gen. John B. Hood, the commander of the Confederate Army of Tennessee, resigned the same day the Union assault on Ft. Fisher near Wilmington, N.C., began. […]

150 Years Ago This Week

150 Years Ago This Week: Failure at Ft. Fisher

On Dec. 14, 1864, nearly 60 ships of the Union naval armada opened fire on Ft. Fisher, near Wilmington, N.C. Diversionary actions Gen. Benjamin Butler, leading the Union Army of the James, was a fiasco, leading to President Lincoln’s relieving the general of his command. […]

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150 Years Ago This Week

150 Years Ago This Week: A Christmas gift for Lincoln

At Savannah, Ga., on Sunday, Dec. 18, 1864, Confederate Lt. Gen. William Hardee refused Maj. Gen. William Sherman’s demand to surrender the city, but it was clear that the city would have to be evacuated by the Confederates before their one route of escape to the north would be closed by the Union troops. […]